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Monthly Archives: December 2016

Tips To Get More Salvage To Craft Custom Weapons In Call of Duty Infinite Warfare

How To Get More Salvage Fast:

Custom weapons and crafting is a great addition to call of duty infinite warfare, the problem is you will need salvage and that can be hard to come by so we have some tips that will help you get there quicker.

The simplest way of getting the currency in the game which is called “Salvage”, this is what you will be spending to create custom weapons; and you will get more by ranking up and playing the game. However, to speed the process up to spend all of the crypto keys that you get and open all of the supply drops. The amount of salvage you get will depend on the rarity of the box.

The other way to speed this up is to focus on the challenges that you get when playing multiplayer. So of course there are different game modes and you will have a main aim in the game, you will also see challenges such as getting a certain amount of head shots with an assault rifle; you can see them all in the top right corner when you are playing the game.

To earn more salvage faster make sure that you keep the focus on completing these challenges even if it means changing your loadout or your weapon temporarily to complete the challenge.

This will not only cause you to rank up faster as you will get more XP, but of course with that you will be able to get more salvage points as well and certain challenges a limited to different types of weapons.

To be able to craft any weapon you will need to unlock the base model before getting access to it is prototype version, you will also need access to the prototype lab.

Getting Started::

This is where you REALLY want to dominate! We show you how to become a force online and start dominating with a complete written guide to all game modes, maps and the tactics you will need…

Mastering The Basics:

Starting with the basics let us show you how to make yourself competitive in the game fast…

There is no getting past the core skills but there are some ways to speed up the learning curve. We have you covered with the basics section in the guide.

Think of this like Boot camp – following this part of the guide alone will have you playing better, faster and get you off to a flying start.

Master The New Combat Rigs …

Sick of trying to work out how to be ‘leet with the new Combat Rigs and which perks to pick? We show you how to master all of them…

There are 6 in total:

Warfighter, Merc, Stryker, FTL, Phantom and Synaptic.

They all behave differently and you NEED to know which one to use depending on the game mode, the map and your playstyle. In this section of the guide we not only show you how to get one that matches your playstyle, as well as tell you which one to use with each map but we will also give you the loadouts and the perks that you need to use to be better FAST!

It’s Not About The Weapons But How You Use Them…

Let us show you how to customize your weapons to make you unstoppable…

Infinite Warfare has changed the way the game used to play!

Let us show you how to make sure you pick the best weapons and know the BEST perks and wildcards to master…

There are also NEW weapons in Infinite Warfare. We walk you through them and tell you which ones to go for to become unstoppable.

Be The Player EVERYONE Wants On Their Team…

Master The Loadouts, Combat Rigs And Perks:

Get A HUGE advantage as we expose every map in the game and how you can have a strategic advantage EVERY time…

We also go through the perfect loadout coupled with the combat rig to suit your gameplay.

We cover every game mode and which combat rig, loadout and perks to use in different situations so you will never be lost on any map and can rock all of them!

Teamwork Made Easy…

Let us show you how you can make the most of your team, the strateiges you need to know how to play based on the circumstances. Once you know how to use the maps to your advantage, chokepoints and your combat rig effectively you will be a force to be reckoned with.

Never Be Last Again…

WARNING: This information will make you a VERY sought after Infinite Warfare player…

Get ready for everyone one to want YOU on their team!

Ready To Dominate Multiplayer?

Play Like A Pro!

Infinite Warfare Guru will show you how you can play like a pro ALMOST overnight…

You don’t have to spend hours practicing!

Simple follow through the strategies in the guide and it is time for some MAJOR payback…

Master All Game Modes!

We run through all game modes whether you want to master Kill Confirmed, Team Deathmatch or Domination it is all here…

Pick The Right Perks & Win

You want to start racking up scorestreaks FAST?

We give you a complete guide to the NEW Perks in the game and how you can have CRAZY Scorestreaks online…

You will master weapons; create a class, all playlists and EVEN how to unlock the BEST scorestreaks bonuses…

Let us tune up those reflexes, skills and most of all give you the edge online…

Get Ready For Some Fun!

If you want to DOMINATE online then Infinite Warfare Guru can help you there! Simply follow our guide and you will be a pro in no time!

How video games are good for the brain

In his speech to America’s schoolchildren last month, President Obama had a clear directive about video games: Put them away. It wasn’t the first time he had sounded this particular alarm, warning of the dangers of days spent at gaming consoles. But the latest science shows that there’s a lot more to video games than their dark reputations suggest.

“There’s still a tendency to think of video games as a big wad of time-wasting content,’’ said Cheryl Olson, co-director of the Center for Mental Health and Media at Massachusetts General Hospital. “You would never hear a parent say we don’t allow books in our home, but you’ll still hear parents say we don’t allow video games in our home.

“Games are a medium. They’re not inherently good or bad.’’

After years of focusing on the bad – and there are still legitimate concerns, for instance, about the psychological effects of certain violent games – scientists are increasingly examining the potential benefits of video games. Their studies are revealing that a wide variety of games can boost mental function, improving everything from vision to memory. Still unclear is whether these gains are long-lasting and can be applied to non-game tasks. But video games, it seems, might actually be good for the brain.

The very structure of video games makes them ideal tools for brain training.

“Video games are hard,’’ said Eric Klopfer, the director of MIT’s Education Arcade, which studies and develops educational video games. “People don’t like to play easy games, and games have figured out a way to encourage players to persist at solving challenging problems.’’

The games aren’t just hard – they’re adaptively hard. They tend to challenge people right at the edge of their abilities; as players get better and score more points, they move up to more demanding levels of play. This adaptive challenge is “stunningly powerful’’ for learning, said John Gabrieli, a neuroscientist at MIT.

Most games involve a huge number of mental tasks, and playing can boost any one of them. Fast-paced, action-packed video games have been shown, in separate studies, to boost visual acuity, spatial perception, and the ability to pick out objects in a scene. Complex, strategy-based games can improve other cognitive skills, including working memory and reasoning.

These findings fit with scientists’ increasing understanding of how malleable the human brain truly is. Researchers now know that learning and practicing a challenging task can actually change the brain.

Richard Haier,a pediatric neurologist and professor emeritus at the School of Medicine at the University of California at Irvine, has shown in a pair of studies that the classic game Tetris, in which players have to rotate and direct rapidly falling blocks, alters the brain. In a paper published last month, Haier and his colleagues showed that after three months of Tetris practice, teenage girls not only played the game better, their brains became more efficient.

A type of scan that illuminates brain activity showed that at the end of the three months, the girls’ brains were working less hard to complete the game’s challenges. What’s more, parts of the cortex, the outer layer of their brains responsible for high-level functions, actually got thicker. Several of these regions are associated with visual spatial abilities, planning, and integration of sensory data.

“Does this mean that Tetris is good for your brain?’’ Haier said. “That is the big question. We don’t know that just because you become better at playing Tetris after practice and your brain changes . . . whether those changes generalize to anything else.’’

Generalizability to non-game situations is the big question surrounding other emerging games, particularly software that is being marketed explicitly as a way to keep neurons spry as we age. The jury is still out on whether practicing with these games helps people outside of the context of the game. In one promising 2008 study, however, senior citizens who started playing Rise of Nations, a strategic video game devoted to acquiring territory and nation building, improved on a wide range of cognitive abilities, performing better on subsequent tests of memory, reasoning, and multitasking. The tests were administered after eight weeks of training on the game. No follow-up testing was done to assess whether the gains would last.

Now that researchers know these off-the-shelf games can have wide-ranging benefits, they’re trying to home in on the games’ most important aspects, potentially allowing designers to create new games that specifically boost brain power.

“Until now, people have been asking can you learn anything from games?’’ MIT’s Klopfer said. “That’s a less interesting question than what aspects of games are important for fostering learning.’’

Klopfer is currently conducting research to determine how important narrative is in an educational physics game: Do students learn more with a more narrative game? And Anne McLaughlin, a psychologist who co-directs the Gains Through Gaming lab at North Carolina State University, is assessing whether games that are novel, include social interaction, and require intense focus are better at boosting cognitive skills. McLaughlin and her colleagues will use the findings to design games geared toward improving mental function among the elderly.

Other researchers are hoping to use video games to encourage prosocial behaviors – actions designed to help others. (“Prosocial’’ behaviors are, in some ways, the opposite of “antisocial’’ ones.) In June, an international team of researchers, including several from Iowa State University, reported that middle school students in Japan who played games in which characters helped or showed affection for others, later engaged in more of these behaviors themselves. Researchers also found that US college students randomly assigned to play a prosocial game were subsequently kinder to a fellow research subject than students who played violent or neutral games.

Unlike, say, movies or books, video games don’t just have content, they also have rules. A game is set up to reward certain actions and to punish others. This means they have immense potential to teach children ethics and values, said Scott Seider, an assistant professor of education at Boston University. (Of course, this is a double-edged sword. Games could reward negative, antisocial behavior just as easily as positive, prosocial behavior.)

Some off-the-shelf games already contain strong prosocial themes; consider The Sims, for instance, or the classic Oregon Trail, which make players responsible for the well-being of other characters and feature characters who take care of one another. But Seider also hopes game developers consider the prosocial possibilities in developing new games. The challenge for the architects of future games will be figuring out how to wrap virtuous characteristics into an engaging package.

PC Games Release Date List April 2017

Tank Assault X – Apr 1

Domina – Apr 3

Evolution Pinball VR: The Summoning – Apr 3

1166 – Apr 3

Feral Fury – Apr 3

Spaceship Looter – Apr 3

Roots of Insanity – Apr 3

Glorch’s Great Escape: Walking is for Chumps – Apr 3

Idle Evolution – Apr 3

What’s under your blanket 2 !? – Apr 3

Armor Clash II – Apr 3

Edengrad – Apr 4

Use Your Words – Apr 4

Survivalizm: The Animal Simulator – Apr 4

Arcane RERaise – Apr 4

Dead Rising 4: Frank Rising – Apr 4

SoulSaverOnline – Apr 4

Serious Sam VR: The Second Encounter – Apr 4

Shovel Knight: Specter of Torment – Apr 5

Paradigm – Apr 5

Vee Rethak: Deep Under The Mountain – Apr 5

One Hit KO – Apr 5

Farm World – Apr 5

Europa Universalis IV: Mandate of Heaven – Apr 6

The Quest for Achievements – Apr 6

Catch a Lover – Apr 6

Shardbound – Apr 6

Crazy Fishing – Apr 6

The Secret Order 5: The Buried Kingdom – Apr 6

Galactic Keep – Apr 6

Steampunk Syndicate – Apr 6

Bulletstorm: Full Clip Edition – Apr 7

Slime-san – Apr 7

A Gummy’s Life – Apr 7

Trickshot – Apr 7

Missile Cards – Apr 7

Bloody Trapland 2: Curiosity – Apr

Radiant Crusade – Apr 7

Forestry – Apr 7

Win That War! – Apr 7

TMM: Entourage – Apr 7

TANKOUT – Apr 10

Cluckles’ Adventure – Apr 10

Cryptocracy – Apr 10

Cosmic Star Heroine – Apr 11

Yooka-Laylee – Apr 11

A Rose in the Twilight – Apr 11

The Sexy Brutale – Apr 11

Creekside Creep Invasion – Apr 11

Lamp Head – Apr 11

Planescape: Torment – Enhanced Edition – Apr 11

Snow Moto Racing Freedom – Apr 11

Impact Winter – Apr 12

Rumpus – Apr 12

The Wild Eternal – Apr 13

Asura – Apr 14

Hot Plates – Apr 14

No70: Eye of Basir – Apr 14

Bounty Killer – Apr 17

Marvel’s Guardians of the Galaxy: The Telltale Series – Apr 18

Shiness: The Lightning Kingdom – Apr 18

Flinthook – Apr 18

Planet Nomads – Apr 18

Late Shift – Apr 18

The Disney Afternoon Collection – Apr 18

WaveLand – Apr 18

Marvel’s Guardians of the Galaxy – Episode 1: Tangled Up in Blue – Apr 18

Army Gals – Apr 19

Wars Across The World – Apr 20

Three Kingdoms: The Last Warlord – Apr 20

The Low Road – Apr 20

Jidousha Shakai – Apr 20

Flatspace IIk – Apr 21

EVERYTHING – Apr 21

Psycho-Pass: Mandatory Happiness – Apr 24

Karnage Chronicles – Apr 24

Syberia 3 – Apr 25

Sniper: Ghost Warrior 3 – Apr 25

Outlast II – Apr 25

Pinstripe – Apr 25

What Remains of Edith Finch – Apr 25

Immortal Redneck – Apr 25

Dragon Quest Heroes II – Apr 25

Insatia – Apr 26

Warhammer 40,000: Dawn of War III – Apr 27

Expeditions: Viking – Apr 27

Geneshift – Apr 27

Under Leaves – Apr 27

Cuit – Apr 27

Super Red-Hot Hero – Apr 28

Viking Rage – Apr 28

Range Day VR – Apr 28

Gold Rush! 2 – Apr 28

Constructor – Apr 28

Higurashi When They Cry Kai: Chapter 5

Meakashi – Apr 28

Little Nightmares – Apr 28

A really awesome modification for Fallout 2

It just came to my (Robin Ek, TGG) attention that DaemonCZ’s “Fallout 2” mod “Fallout 1.5: Resurrection” won the “Fan Creation of the Year” award at the SXSW Gaming Awards, because as you might remember. I wrote that Sergeant Mark IV’s “Brutal Doom 64” won the very same award just the other day.However, I honestly didn’t hear about “Fallout 1.5: Resurrection” until today (I must have missed the mod’s trailer during the SXSW eventdue to the excitement over Brutal Doom 64’s award victory).

Anyways, I just gave Fallout 1.5 a try myself, and I’ll have you know that it’s a freaking awesome “Fallout 2” mod. So much so that I would recommend everyone to give it a try for themselves (you won’t regret it!). Well, I think you got the idea that I like the mod a whole lot, but what exactly is “Fallout 1.5: Resurrection”? Well, this is the actual mod description by the creator himself (DaemonCZ):

“Fallout 1.5: Resurrection is a modification for Fallout 2. Its story takes place chronologically between 1 and 2, hence the name. It takes place in New Mexico. Content-wise, it rivals or possibly surpasses the original Fallout.

Fallout 1.5: Resurrection is a new, old-school Fallout. It’s a modification for Fallout 2 with a completely new story taking place in the Fallout universe. The plot is set in the time between Fallout 1 and 2, east of the future NCR in New Mexico. That means you won’t visit the original places. Instead, you’ll discover entirely new, creative locations that allowed us to have more freedom with the story. The player’s character wakes up, heavily wounded, in a dark cave, not knowing how it got there, or who it is.

Thus you start from a scratch, searching for your past, which is darker than it might seem on the first sight… We won’t give away any more details about the story, not to spoil your game experience. Though you can count on surprising twists in plot and unexpected finale. As big fans of Fallout, we’ve tried to take the best from all of the classic Fallout games.

Easter eggs and jokes, with which Fallout 2 was literally overfilled, have been folded into the background. Instead, the great atmosphere of decadence and hopelessness enjoyed by so many in the first Fallout game returns. The world is still chaotic, with only a few, small, independent communities connected by tenuous trade relations. The wasteland is an unfriendly place where law is on the side of whoever has the biggest gun.

The name “Resurrection” was chosen for two reasons. Firstly, resurrection is a theme tied closely to the main character who, at the beginning of the game, practically rises from the dead. Secondly, our modification represents the resurrection of good old Fallout. We didn’t want to re-imagine the entire game system. Instead, our aim was to bring back this classic RPG in its original form. Many remember that feeling when they first played Fallout; until you completed the game, you journeyed through interesting locations filled with fascinating things.

Even after several play-throughs, you continued to find new, exciting stuff. Players could really get into such a game, so that’s exactly the kind of game we’ve endeavoured to create”.